The Religion of Peace

The word Sharia (شريعة) with a red x superimposed.
The word Sharia (شريعة) with a red x superimposed. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sharia in the UK: Church banned from using public market stall after distributing leaflet criticizing Islam

Do you think a group distributing a leaflet entitled “Why Not Christianity?” would have been banned? No, I don’t think so, either. “Norwich church banned from using market stall after complaints about ‘hate-related’ leaflets,” by Peter Walsh for the Norwich Evening News, April 14 (thanks to The Religion of Peace):

A church has been banned from using a market stall to hold its weekly outreach service following a complaint about “hate-motivated” leaflets published by the group.

The Norwich Reformed Church held a weekly outreach bookstall from the Norwich City Council-owned site on Hay Hill, but has been informed it is no longer allowed to use the stall after the council received a complaint about literature on it. The complaint prompted a review of the materials produced by Reverend Alan Clifford, pastor of the church, and the council contacted police as materials, particularly the leaflet entitled Why not Islam, were considered to be hate-motivated.

The church has been prohibited from using the site, while the council-run Eaton Park Community Centre has also been contacted with a view to ceasing any further bookings made by the church.

A council spokesman said: “We received a complaint from a member of the public about material published by the Norwich Reformed Church (associated with the Farthing Trust) which uses council facilities. This was considered to be hate-motivated and, in accordance with the agreed Norfolk Multi Agency Protocol, we contacted the police.

“Although the police advised that no criminal offence had been committed, we have a duty under the Equality Act 2010 to foster good relations between people of all backgrounds and religions. By allowing premises owned by the council to be used by an organisation publishing such material, we would be failing in that duty. People across Norfolk have recently been urged to stand up to hate-motivated and intolerant behaviour through a publicity campaign and as a council we have to play our part and take action where necessary.”…

About these ads

3 thoughts on “The Religion of Peace”

  1. Here is a Memorial Day Outrage coming of course from MSNBC:

    ‘Come Up With a More Neutral Term’: MSNBC Panel Debates Using the Word ‘Hero’ To Describe Fallen Soldiers

    MSNBC is not known as a network that sympathizes with the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan, but this Memorial Day weekend, rather than put aside their political differences to salute our men and women in uniform, a panel on Chris Hayes’ show instead engaged in a debate over how to refer to our fallen soldiers.

    Specifically, the panel debated over using words like “hero” because– in their words– the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan aren’t “worthy” causes.

    Chris Hayes introduces the issue:

    “I feel uncomfortable about the word ‘hero’ because it seems to me that it is so rhetorically proximate to justifications for more war. Um, and, I don’t want to obviously desecrate or disrespect memory of anyone that’s fallen, and obviously there are individual circumstances in which there is genuine, tremendous heroism, you know, hail of gunfire, rescuing fellow soldiers, and things like that. But it seems to me that we marshal this word in a way that is problematic. But maybe I’m wrong about that…”
    John McWhorter of the New York Daily News continued: “…I would almost rather not say ‘hero’ and come up with a more neutral term…I share your
    discomfort with those words because they are argumentational strategies in themselves, often without wanting to be.”

    Michelle Goldberg of the Daily Beast, who recently compared Ann Romney to Hitler and Stalin on the same network, added: “There are people who are genuine heroes, but the kind of implication is that death is what makes you a hero, you know as opposed to any kind of affirmative act or moral act…”

    After reassuring that there is honor and valor in the military, Goldberg said: “It’s more just that, it’s a way of ennobling sacrifices that have a lot of nobility for the individual, but to say that someone kind of died heroically suggests that they died worthily, or that they died in the pursuit of a worthy endeavor…” [Emphasis added]

    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/msnbc-panel-struggles-over-using-the-word-hero-to-describe-fallen-soldiers/

    Like

  2. Reblogged this on Citizen Tom and commented:
    One would expect most clerics to claim that what their faith tradition teaches is most correct. In nations dominated by Christians, Christian clerics generally try to prove Christianity is best by comparing and contrasting Christianity with other religions. In nations dominated by Muslims, Muslims silence and punish non-Muslims. Such behavior is in fact promoted as part of that faith’s religious doctrine, and it seems that the tolerant souls who thought up the Equality Act 2010 also think that such intolerance is the correct approach.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s